Tag Archive | art

Style, to death…

Welcome to a new week.

This week we would like to start to discuss style.

Style has been talked about by numerous artists, art directors and fans of art on so many occasions that it could be considered to be a done-to-death-topic. Nevertheless we’d like to bring it up in a two-part blog to showcase some of the more interesting styles out there that do not fully fall within the mainstream of western culture. At the end of these two articles (or possibly in a third installment) we will discuss what we can take with us from these different styles and see if we can use it to further our own styles.

This week and some other articles on style

This week we will talk about Western artists and some styles of Western origins. Next week we will bring up some Eastern artists and their styles.

For some interesting articles on Style in general, there are some to be found through Muddy Colors.

Here are a few:

http://muddycolors.blogspot.be/2012/06/style.html

http://muddycolors.blogspot.be/2014/06/honing-your-vision-ruminations-on-style.html

http://muddycolors.blogspot.be/2013/05/walt-disney-on-pursuing-style.html

Western Styles

When it comes to western styles, these ae the styles that most of the readers of this blog have grown up with. You see it on a daily, or weekly, basis. You have seein it in comicbooks, storybooks, museums, and game-art. These are the ones you all know about, and if we mention just a few well known examples you will immediately have an idea of what they would look like.

Frank Frazetta

Boris Vallejo & Julie Bell

Jeffrey Catherine Jones

Brom

Paul Bonner

To mention some of the contemporary ones.

The above artists and their styles have already had a huge impact on western styles in general. In some cases, like with Frazzetta and Jones, their respective styles have influenced whole generations, where as the others are inspiring on a grand scale, even if they might not have influenced entire generations. These artists, of course, stand on the shoulders of their own artheroes, whether early 20th century american popular artists like James Montgomery Flagg or N.C. Wyeth, or earlier masters ranging back in time to El Greco and Fra Angelico.

Point in case unique styles

Let us take a moment to mention two artists with unique styles that are worth taking a closer look at.

Mike Mignola

Rocketeer – Mike Mignola/Dave Stewart

Mike Mignola has a very distinct style, based mainly on solid fields of colour or shades.

Visible in his Hellboy-series, the most prominent part of the style is how black and white is used to create drama, often the “white” areas are filled with a solid colour (mostly aptly added by Dave Stewart) to create different ammounts of shade. Mignola also uses a very bold sense of shapes. His characters could almost be seen as charicatures with their oversimplyfied traits, more so then most comicbooks. But it is a great style because it conveys a lot of feeling. The bad guys look bad already at first glance. The Good guys (and gals) are very evocative in how they look and the style shows how every persona feel very well just through poses and how they are drawn in any given situation. Mignola have also mastered texturing in this style. Often making extraordinary large beasts look like they where made out of concrete or some sort of stone-material. Esotheric or non-physical beings, beams, or energy is often illustrated in a very solid fascion, but the way Mignola adds texture will tell the viewer that this is something special.

Justin Gerard

Justin-gerard-spells-are-hardSpells Are Hard – Justin Gerard

Gerard has a playful style, filled with humour. Where most illustration today is moving towards more realism, Gerard manages to make his illustrations not only have an element of humour but also mintain a very good sense of colour and saturation. Gerard also mixes traditional sketching an painting with digital very effective, often giving his works a very nice textured feeling. To an extent one can see the same playfulness and humour as in the works of Paul Bonner, but where Bonner works exclusively with traditional mediums, Gerard has learnt to take full advantage of both traditional and digital mediums.

When going to see Gerards works, be sure to also take a look at the works of his wife, Annie Stegg Gerard, who is an accomplished artist as well.

So that’s a quick look at some Western Styles that are unique. Do you have any other artists with styles you find unique? Let us know in the comments!

Next Week

Next week we will take a look at some eastern artists, both contemporary and historical, to see if we can use them to help further, and find our own unique style.

If you have any suggestions on artists we should look at please let us know through the comments below, or through our Facebook page. or Twitter Page  (dont forget to hashtag with #dontfeartheclown on Twitter!).

Sketch and a WiP

Here is a sketch for the next Primarch and a WiP of the illustration for the Ars Scribendi winner. Next week we hope to be able to show you even further evolutions of these two.

Guillimanpreviewarsscribendipreview

Commissions

If you are interested in private commissions we have three slots open this week.

For more info and contact, go to the bottom of the About page and send us a message through the contact form.

Tell us what you think about todays blogpost. Use the form on the about page (link in sentence just above this) or through our Facebook page. or Twitter Page (hashtag it with #dontfeartheclown) We’d love to see your input!

“Have no fear of perfection, you’ll never reach it” S.Dali

New week, new things

Hello and welcome to this (delayed) update. As mentioned last week, a lot of deadlines converge on and around the same time, leading to some extra working hours. With as a result this the blog-update was delayed.

Right now, there is nothing of the illustrations that where just completed under deadlines we can how you. These are pending release of the products they where made for or release from the Non Disclosure Agreements they’re under.

The end of all these deadlines does mean that there are some openings in our schedule for more private commissions. See below for more info.

Traveling the Road

So yesterday an image was shared via Aaron, relating to the project he and David are working on. Some of you may have seen it, some may not. We thought we’d share it here also:

first-done

A few (very few) hints of information:

Yes – it is called “The Road to Jove”.

No – it is not a novel.

Yes – that’s a stop-sign on that big things shoulder.

Yes- the markings on its chest are starting to glow red.

No- it’s not going to take forever until it’s out, but we’re not narrowing it down for you just yet.

No- we’re not telling you anymore right now!

Gathering Ideas

Here at Studio Colrouphobia we are always looking to interact with our friends and fans, so we thought we’d ask you what, in the past months, have been the most interesting for you to read here on our blog?

What would you like to see more of? Do you have a favorite topic or post that you think represent what you think you should see more of from us? Last week we shared some websites an articles related to working as an artist, conceptartist, or wanting to commission an artist. In the past we have shared, amongst other things, tutorials, insight in how we work as artists and a studio, interviews with other artists, and just plain posts with art.

This is your chance to let us know what you would like to see more of. Let us know by replying to this blog-post, or through our Facebook page.. Or you can also send us an email through the contact form on the About page.

Commissions

If you are interested in private commissions we have four slots open this week.

For more info and contact, go to the bottom of the About page and send us a message through the contact form.

Tell us what you think about todays blogpost. Use the form on the about page (link in sentence just above this) or through our Facebook page. or Twitter Page (hashtag it with #dontfeartheclown) We’d love to see your input!

What you need and what you want….

Hello there,

Welcome to yet another blogpost. It’s been another week and it was a busy one.
Several deadlines converged in short succession and as such there are a lot of finished illustrations, but alas little to show until they have been published.

Because of this, we thought we’d show you some general goodness on, and for, artists.

For the artist (and client)

30092014-artpact

Artpact.com is a tool to help Freelance Fantasy, Sci-fi, Comic book, and other illustrators negotiate a better living for themselves.
It is easy to think that life as an illustrator is great.
A lot of people approaching us in regards to our studio and working as artists or illustrators have this belief that we have all the spare time in the world, that all we do all day is exactly what we want, that it is easy, goes faster then a blink of an eye and that we roll in cash.

It really is not like that at all. In fact, it is all hard work. Often working with illustration means you have to paint what others want, not what you want. Deadlines are tight, you can’t display what you painted (sometimes up to years after you painted it). And this belief that it is simple, doesn’t cost much time or effort, and so should be more or less for free, mean that even p-professional clients have rules and contracts that make it even tougher to survive on being an illustrator.

Artpact.com is there to help the struggling artist.

But even if you are just interested in commissioning an artist, we suggest you go and read some of the articles there. Our suggestion is these two articles:

The Cost of Being an Illustrator - To give you an insight in why commissions cost as much as they do. There are costs for running a business, and before we even brake even, these costs must be deducted.

Dealing with Difficult Clients – Here you will find things you should try to think about as a client. We’re all humans, but these are some of the things that make artists feel less happy about a commission. And in the end, making sure to avoid these things will make your commission end up much more like what you had in mind.

On art and artists

30092014-Muddy

Muddy Colors is a place that’s all about art, artists, being an artist, being an art director, or just appreciating art.
If you are interesting in anything in regards to popular art, chances are that you will find something about it here.
The blog-posters are all illustrators, sculptors, 3D-artists, art directors, or gallerists. Dan Dos Santos, Arnie Fenner, Terryl Whitlatch, Lauren Panepinto, Greg Manchess, to name a few of them, are all very helpful in showing bits about art in all its forms, whether you want to work as an artist, hire an artist, or just appreciate good art.

30092014-fzd

Feng Zhu Design School Cinema is a Youtube channel that gives insights in what it’s like to work as a concept artist. With more then 70 episodes, most longer then half an hour, this is a vast source of inspiration, help, and insight in what it means working in the entertainment business as an artist. And if you just want to paint for fun, just watch as Feng Zhu and his guest-instructors paint, talk about things like composition and colourtheory. You should be able to find just about anything on the technical aspects of painting and illustrating, as well as conceptualizing, except for the foundations. This is something Feng Zhu teaches at his school in Singapore. And even some foundation bits can be found here and there.

Whilst you’re at it, go check out Feng’s own art gallery initiative, in the wake of the loss of CGHUB, DrawCrowd. You might find some art you never seen before.

Commissions

If you are interested in private commissions we have three slots open this week.

For more info and contact, go to the bottom of the About page and send us a message through the contact form.

Tell us what you think about todays blogpost. Use the form on the about page (link in sentence just above this) or through our Facebook page. or Twitter Page (hashtag it with #dontfeartheclown) We’d love to see your input!

Sketches, it’s all about the sketches…

Hi there,

Time for another update!
We hope you enjoyed the week that passed and that a good week is ahead of you.

 

Lesser art?
This week we would like to show some sketches and lineart.
Now when you think of sketches and/or lineart there is often an automatic dissmissal of them in comparison to illustrations or renders.
These sort of generalizations are commonplace in almost any form of artistic or creative works.

Theatre is better then the movies, opera is more cultured then jazz, illustration is more sofisticated then sketches and lineart.

Quite the contrary, all of these forms have their value and are quite separated from one another as far as what you must go through to make sure it is complete and good, purpose and result.

As such, a theatre play might demand alot of the acotr’s skill to portray the feelings of their character clearly to an audience, whereas the actor in a fil can rely on more subtle displays. Opera has a certain story and background that weigh in on how the music is experienced whereas jazz is based on feeling and interaction with the crowd.

Sketches

When it comes to sketches, then, they are as varied as there are reasons to make them. Sketches can be instrumental in finding design, meant as training, to act as support for an illustration, or simply be the base of a painting. A Sketch can be a very clear image, going to an almost illustrated finnish, or it can be loose and wobbly, relying on the feel of it, rather then anatomical or visual accuracy.

Lineart

Likewise, Lineart has its place as either an artform in itself, there to supply support for an illustration or a base for a painting. Often a piece of lineart has sketches made as a base, but this is not always the case.

 

Here, then, are a couple of examples:

23-09-2014khan

Lineart, Khan the Destroyer. Natasja is exploring this character and a couple of others in the style of lineart with ery simple colours.

dwarf23-09-2014015

Study/Sketch of a Dwarf, intended for future illustration or painting. The intent is to get the character and the feel of him down in these lines, to better paint or illustrate it fully at a later time. Whereas Natasja drew this sketch, it might be either her or David who will end up painting or illustrating this in the future. Collaborations like this can have a major role in improving ones skill and ideas for design.

 

groot23-09-2014

Groot. Though not yet complete, this is an illustration. The idea was to take the character and illustrate it/him without adhering or copying the style of any other artist.

CaptureCapture123-09-2014

And finally, three examlpes of sketches.

The first one is a colour sketch trying to explore a character. The second is a more detailed sketch trying to get some more details into the character, and the third one is a base sketch for an illustration. The object of the three is the same character, and they are all sketches, but done with different goals in mind.

 

Next week

Next week we might bother Aaron for a quick pop-by to talk about why he thought it might be a good idea to team up with David for their sideproject
We’ll see if he has the time for it, and it might just be very mysterious and silent about exactly what it is.

Commissions

If you are interested in private commissions we have one slot open this week.

For more info and contact, go to the bottom of the About page and send us a message through the contact form.

Tell us what you think about todays blogpost. Use the form on the about page (link in sentence just above this) or through our Facebook page. or Twitter Page (hashtag it with #dontfeartheclown) We’d love to see your input!

Gone fishing…

Hello there,

Welcome back to another update. This week we will let you see some process images on how to find concepts through randomness.

Throwing the net

So you’re trying to figure something out. A concept.

It doesn’t have to be concept art that is the ultimate goal. Perhaps you are exploring charachters, creatures or any form of machinery as part of a larger illustration you are doing.

How do you actually get from “I have no idea” to a complete concept?

A long time ago, when we started doing this as a sidejob, Andrew Jones said “You throw out a net and reel in the concept“.

Let’s see if we can show you an example of it.

The small fish

David Started this by using Alchemy.org, a free program for getting random shapes. You can use any number of random shape-generating programmes, ranging from fractal programmes to zbrush and even specific randomizing brushes in Photoshopp or Painter.

The beauty of this particular programme is that you do not have to know how to paint or illustrate to get somewhere, you only need to try to get random shapes that resemble something. The artistic part comes when you start putting together more complex pieces. Here are some of the first shapes.

000006

These are just random shapes that came out after playing around with Alchemy for a while. Though there are six on this particular sheet, David came up with closer to fifty different shapes that he collected into one file.

Catching the medium-sized fish

So now we take these shapes into Photoshop (or any photo-editing/illustration programme of your choice) and start putting them together in interesting ways. In Photoshop, David cut and paste the shapes on top of one another. Moving things around, turning and flipping and sometimes even erasing to get more interesting shapes.

The idea is to get a silhouette of that looks robotic, but what exactly is not certain at this stage, so David is going for various things, ranging from quadroped robots, to biped robots. Tall and slender to short and robust. The key is the silhouette. The details inside the silhouette are bonuses for later, when we detail the concept.

The addition of colour can help make parts stand out; This doesn’t neccesarily mean these parts will have that colour in a final illustration. The colours can represent anything from actual coloured panels, to lightsources, beams, special areas of some sort that will look vastly different on the final concept/illustration but that for now just need to be marked out as “special”.

variations00001

So the sky is really the limit here, these above are the first groups David put together. He then made a couple of more, and started combining them together.

The bigger fish

After putting the first few shapes together, David have some basic robotic shapes. It is very easy to stop at this point and be happy, and some of the best concepts can be done at this stage, but it feels a little stale, so David combine this group of ten simpler silhouettes into some more complex ones. Not all work out, and it is important to be selective about the silhouette at this point. If two look the same, look at which one feels the most interesting as far as details go. Discard the other, or save it in a separate file for usage another day. Eventually, we havet six variations that can be used for illustrations.

Here is one of these simple bases:

RoughConcepts00003

And from there we can make an illustrated concept, or go straight to illustration, if it feels like everything needed is there.

The big fish

So here is a sneak-peek of something that will come out of this particular fish-net (not based on the above image, but something else).

300001

This is meant for the project David and Aaron Debski-Bowden is putting together and we are hoping to be able to show you much more before the end of the year.

Hopefully this introduction to concepting gave you guys some ideas and motivation to go out and practice. We would love to see links to your own concepts, practice or otherwise!

As always, you can find things through social medias, so keep an eye out for updates and sketches on Facebook,Twitterand Tumblr.

Commissions

If you are interested in private commissions we have three slots open this week.

For more info and contact, go to the bottom of the About page and send us a message through the contact form.

Tell us what you think about todays blogpost. Use the form on the about page (link in sentence just above this) or through our Facebook page. or Twitter Page (hashtag #dontfeartheclown) We’d love to hear your input!

Jingling the Bells

Hi there, and welcome to this weeks blogpost.

This week we’d like to take the time to discuss something that might seem far away, but that you should start thinking about, should you want to use an artist’s services for it.

We’re talking about Christmas.

 

Yes, it might seem a bit over the top to talk about Christmas and Christmas presents when we just turned our calendar over to September, but to be able to make it the merriest of hollidays, we really need to bring this up.

So you want to give away art for Christmas?

Let’s say you want to surprise someone with a piece of art for their Christmas. There are many ways you can do this, depending on what you want. There are fantastic galleries out there where you can find the right piece for just about anyone. Usually, a gallery-piece will not be that problematic to acquire in time for Christmas.

There are also multiple shops, artists, and other establishments, that carry posters and prints of artwork. If you acquire something like this, we hope you take the time to make sure the right person(s) get paid. Usually an artist will charge less for a better quality poster/print then a counterfeit. Might be worth noting.

 

So you want to commission an original piece of art for Christmas?

But what we wanted to discuss was the commissioning of an original artpiece, whether painted with brush on canvas, pencil on paper, digital and printed, or other.

For these sort gifts, you need to be out in time. Know your artist. Learn what sort of deadlines he/she works with. Find out if they are specifically busy for Christmas, if they have any special deals that might come up, for hollidays before Christmas maybe even.

Traditional Artists

Alot of artists that work traditionally will have a lot of orders for artwork coming in before Christmas. You need to consider that artists like Dan Dos Santos take about three to six weeks to complete their traditional oilpaintings, and that they might want to dry their paintings for a certain ammount of time before shipping them. If they have a lot of commissions, they might have waitingtimes until November-December already.

Digital Artists

At the other end, where you find artists like Noah Bradley, the digital artists will probably not need such a long time to paint for you, though it varies. The problem for a digital illustrator is rather going to be at the printing-end. The closer you get to Christmas, the longer in advance you will need to contact printers about printing things. Some printers specialize in art-prints, some are multiprinting businesses and will have a lot to do with Christmas cards, brochures an everything Christmassy.

What about Studio Colrouphobia?

So, you might ask yourself, where do we find Studio Colrouphobia in this? Well, we do both traditional and digital. It all depends on what it is you are looking for. So if you are interested in commissioning us for Christmas, you should first figure out what it is you would like to get, then contact us relatively soon, so we can discuss around making sure that your gift becomes the thing it should be- a joy for the person who will receive it.

 

Eyecandy

For some eyecandy, since we try our best to include something every blogpost, here is a private commission David just finished for a Shadowrun player

-AndrejsOrch

 

And how about another small sneak-peek at something from the secret project Aaron and David are working on?

Capture1

 

As always, you can find things through social medias, so keep an eye out for updates and sketches on Facebook,Twitterand Tumblr.

 

Commissions

If you are interested in private commissions we have two slots open this week. Last week the two last slots with discounts where taken, but keep an eye out for other drives in the future.

For more info and contact, go to the bottom of the About page and send us a message through the contact form.

 

Tell us what you think about todays blogpost. Use the form on the about page (link in sentence just above this) or through our Facebook page. We’d love to hear your input.

Stop, in the name…

Capture

Another week has passed.

We are still working on both professional jobs, and private commissions, but keep an eye out for updates and sketches on Facebook, Twitterand Tumblr. We are also trying to enjoy the weather, which is difficult when all you can do is singing in the rain right now.

 

This might interest some of you-

Capture
The sideproject David is doing that we have mentioned in recent posts is going well. So well, in fact, that they have decided to let a little of it be revealed. First of all, this is really a side project that David and Aaron is dabbling with it on their spare-time.

That’s right, Aaron Dembski-Bowden and David decided to try to come up with something new together. We’re not going to reveal all about this just yet, but we thought you might like to see some of the initial concepts. Look to the Facebook pages of Aaron Dembski-Bowden and Studio Colrouphobia, and this blog and that of Aaron for future updates.

But you wanted to see some images, right? The above snippet is a hint at something with a stop-sign. And below are some initial concepts for a character.

Girl-no-visorGirl-visor-fixedwaistGirl-visorGirl-no-visor-fixedwaist

 

Commissions

If you are interested in private commissions we have two slots open this week and those are also the two last slots open with 100 Euro discount. First come, first serve.

For more info and contact, go to the bottom of the About page and send us a message through the contact form.

 

Tell us what you think about todays blogpost. Use the form on the about page (link in sentence just above this) or through our Facebook page. We’d love to hear your input.

Next week will see a few first steps for the Ars Scribendi Contest Winner. Until then, enjoy your week!

 

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